Ideal Soil pH Ranges for Vegetables

Soil pHKnowing the right pH values for vegetables in your garden can be the difference between growing buckets of tomatoes or just enough for a BLT or two.

Finding the Right pH Ranges for Your Vegetables

Although most garden soils have pH ranges between 4.0 and 8.0, most of the vegetables we love grow best in pH ranges between 6.0 and 7.0. Instead of guessing what pH your vegetables need to succeed, use the table below to what pH vegetables need to grow best.

Vegetable

pH Range

Beans (pole) 6.0 – 7.5
Beets 6.0 – 7.5
Broccoli 6.0 – 7.0
Brussels sprouts
6.0 – 7.5
Cabbage
6.0 – 7.5
Carrots 5.0 – 7.0
Cauliflower
5.5 – 7.5
Celery 6.0 – 7.0
Corn 5.5 – 7.5
Cucumber 5.5 – 7.0
Edamame
5.8 – 6.5
Eggplant 5.5 – 6.5
Garlic 5.5 – 7.5
Gourd 6.5 – 7.5
Kale
6.0 – 7.5
Kohlrabi 6.0 – 7.5
Lettuce 6.0 – 7.0
Melon 5.5 – 6.5
Okra 6.0 – 7.5
Onion 6.0 – 7.0
Peanuts 5.0 – 6.5
Peas
6.0 – 7.5
Peppers 5.5 – 7.0
Potato 4.5 – 6.0
Radish
6.0 – 7.0
Spinach 6.0 – 7.5
Squash, summer 6.0 – 7.5
Squash, winter 5.5 – 7.0
Sunflower 6.0 – 7.5
Sweet potato 5.5 – 6.0
Tomato 5.5 – 7.5
Zucchini
6.0 – 6.5

What is pH and Why Do pH Ranges Matter?

Soil pH is a measure of the acidity and alkalinity for a given sample of soil. It is measured along a pH scale that runs from 1 (the acidic end) to 14 (the alkaline end). pH values of 7 signify that a soil sample is neutral, and everything in between ranges from very acidic to very alkaline. If your soil’s pH is “off,” it can affect how well your plants take up nutrients, and (therefore) how well they handle stress, fight disease, and grow. If your vegetables aren’t growing the way they used to, your pH may be off and it may be time to check your soil pH.

If you’re an herb gardener, click here for information about pH ranges for herbs.

Image thanks to Diana House!


Related Posts:

Have something to say?